T comes right after LGB

My Paypal piece received mixed reviews, but my editor at MercatorNet liked it enough to republish it, whereupon the consensus from commenters was that I had either written a piece of satire, or the most deeply anti-gay screed ever published on that site.

The beauty of art appreciation is that there are no wrong answers. I guess that applies to article appreciation as well. Puts a different spin on internet comments, n’est-ce pas?

Anyhow, my latest piece at MercatorNet is a brief response to the apparent acceleration of the sexual revolution. We’re only in June and already it feels like Transgender Appreciation Month. My how time flies when you’re re-engineering social constructs of gender.

http://www.mercatornet.com/conjugality/view/t-comes-right-after-lgb

If thine eye offend thee…

My latest piece on MercatorNet looks at the extremely sad case of a woman who intentionally blinded herself with drain cleaner, and goes on to suggest that “transableism” and transgenderism alike are just the latest symptoms of an increasingly irreligious world that believes in the possibility and the proximity of worldly happiness:

Our society is increasingly devoid of the scepticism toward worldly goals embodied in the major religious traditions. We no longer have people telling us that the world is an illusion, a shipwreck, a “vanity of vanities”. We are lacking the kind of unwavering clarity that pours cold water not only on the outer-reaches of our struggles for worldly fulfilment, but the inner-reaches as well: wealth, career, social esteem, fashion, passion, and pride.

Our religious traditions are united in wishing to dispel the illusion that the world can grant us real happiness, whether it be through the accumulation of possessions or being called by the “correct” pronouns.

http://www.mercatornet.com/articles/view/a-new-identity-will-not-make-you-happy

Is Bruce Jenner now a woman?

Most of my regular audience at MercatorNet would have no difficulty answering such a question, so instead of writing something about essentialism and the possible philosophical intricacies of gender, I wrote the following:

If Augustine was objective enough to acknowledge the positive side of pagan Rome, perhaps we should do the same with the transgender movement and indeed to the associated identity issues of the wider LGBT movement. It is important for those of us with profound philosophical, ethical, and religious reservations to recognise that the LGBT narrative nonetheless instantiates or at least mirrors certain virtues, in particular a quality often referred to as “authenticity” in contemporary language and which could perhaps be interpreted as a variation on the virtue of honesty.  The alternative is to fail to understand why these narratives hold such sway among the general public.