Count Your Blessings Day 7

I love my kids! They are so rewarding!

My son is such a smart and caring and lovely kid. And my 1yo daughter is so adorable!

She once again soothed herself to sleep in her cot!

I’m so proud of my son, especially with how well he has taken to the “feeling game” tricks I’ve been practicing with him. We work on subjects together, helping each other find ways to feel good about them.

My favourite part is when he comes home all excited to tell me how well the feeling game worked.

Kids have very little resistance to good things happening, so he’s a real source of inspiration for me.

We keep coming up with new tricks and ideas that help him (and me) soothe difficult subjects and find inspiration.

Translating these concepts for a child’s point of view is a lot of fun and helps solidify my own understanding.

Besides, he really keeps me honest and on track with my own feeling processes. His lower resistance inspires me to do better with my difficult subjects.

And as children often do, asking “Why? Or Why not?” prompts me to reconsider and think more openly about life’s possibilities.

Evolution

When I started this “Count Your Blessings” series I had no idea what to expect from it.

But with each iteration I feel things shifting subtly. Part of me wants to be really consistent and methodical (because it’s counting). Instead it’s evolving because my ability to appreciate is growing, and with that I am able to appreciate new things, and old things in new ways.

I don’t have a clear sense of where this is headed, but I’m noticing episodic changes in how I perceive things.

Like my “doing the dishes” post, and my success with getting our 1yo to go to sleep by herself, I’m finding myself suddenly inspired to look at difficult aspects of my life and instead of rejecting the unwanted, find in myself a genuine desire for something I can love and appreciate.

How I want my life to be, my relationships to be, my family, career, income and health, home and hobbies…everything can be transformed and translated by finding the aspects we desire in love and appreciation.

The Kid Handicap

Over at ‘Jumping to Conclusions’ friend dtcwee has an interesting post taking issue with the ‘children are expensive’ narrative.

Yours truly is tired of the assumption that his wealth is due to being child-free. Although children imply expense, they do not as such prevent saving. And yet, the sheer weight behind the ‘children are expensive’ narrative stifles me.
[…]
The sticker shock of AUD$400,000 per middle-class child has to be spread across 24 years. Adjusting for inflation at 2.7%, that’s about $230 per week; the cost of two smoking habits. For a single working parent, it would be tight but do-able. For a couple with one and a half incomes, a breeze.

http://dtcwee.blogspot.com.au/2014/11/the-kid-handicap.html

As a parent seeking to enjoy a richer life despite a drastically reduced income, it helps to read incisive critiques of prevailing narratives that depict having children as potentially financially ruinous.